Everyone Looks So Familiar

Nameless portraits from throughout 15th to 19th century European art are reduced to simplified ink drawings, and then further reduced as only a ‘digital selection,’ barely separating the drawing from the white space of the webpage. The ‘digital selection’ is used as an allusion to designate something that doesn’t wholly exist or hold form. The portraits are diminished to how we might view them now, as aesthetic husks of lives and memories that weren’t quite influential enough. “His online series Everyone Looks So Familiar, shows a set of Renaissance and Baroque figures rendered in the flickering line of a capture tool. All other pixel information is removed and we are left with the equivalent of a digital x-ray of these images. These works use the data of imagery to raise issues of reproduction in the digital age and the future (and perhaps unstoppable) predominance of online experiences with artwork.” — Gregory Thielker

2014

Josh Sender